Honda CR-V Gearbox

Published by Carl Wilson on

Welcome to enginesandgearboxes.co.uk, we are specialists in Honda CR-V automatic and manual Gearboxes. Our dedicated customer service representatives are available to help you with your enquires and our team of expert technicians are ready to help you with all makes and models of gearboxes.

We have invested in the most modern and technologically advanced network equipment, which helps us to ensure that your Honda CR-V Gearbox is accurate which saves you time and money. …let us help you today to find a competitive quote.

Our entire automatic and manual gearboxes are available new, second hand and remanufacture or reconditioned to the highest standards. All our gearbox components meet or exceed all original manufactures specifications, and most of the time the Honda CR-V Gearbox components are sourced from our specialist breakers. You can buy with confidence from us, knowing that you have the best quality CR-V gearbox with the best warranty protection. We have an extensive network of industry contacts to ensure you find what you are looking for.

A CR-V Gearbox

Without a gearbox in the CR-V, they would be limited to one gear ratio, and that ratio would have to be selected to allow the car to travel at the top speed. If you wanted a top speed of 80 mph, then the gear ratio would be similar to third gear in most manual gearbox cars.

You’ve probably never tried driving a manual gearbox car using only third gear. If you did, you’d quickly find out that you had almost no acceleration when starting out, and at high speeds, the engine would be screaming along near the -line. A car like this would wear out very quickly and would be nearly undriveable.

The key difference between a manual and an automatic gearbox is that the manual gearbox locks and unlocks different sets of gears to the output shaft to achieve the various gear ratios, while in an automatic gearbox; the same set of gears produces all of the different gear ratios.

How Manual Gearboxes Works for the CR-V

If you drive a stick-shift car, then you may have several questions floating in your head.

How does the funny “H” pattern that I am moving this shift knob through have any relation to the gears inside the gearbox? What is moving inside the gearbox when I move the shifter?

When I mess up and hear that horrible grinding sound, what is actually grinding? What would happen if I were to accidentally shift into reverse while I am speeding down the freeway? Would the entire gearbox explode?

Cars need gearboxes because of the physics of the petrol engine. First, any engine has a line, a maximum rpm value above which the engine cannot go without exploding. Second, if you have known about how hp works, then you know that engines have narrow rpm ranges where horsepower and torque are at their maximum. For example, an engine might produce its maximum horsepower at 5,500 rpm. The gearbox allows the gear ratio between the engine and the drive wheels to change as the car speeds up and slows down. You shift gears so the engine can stay below the line and near the rpm band of its best performance. Ideally, the gearbox would be so flexible in its ratios that the engine could always run at its single, best performance rpm value. That is the idea behind the continuously variable gearbox (CVT).

A CVT has a nearly infinite range of gear ratios. In the past, CVTs could not compete with 4 speed and 5 speed gearboxes in terms of cost, size and reliability, so you didn’t see them in production automobiles. These days, improvements in design have made CVTs more common. The gearbox is connected to the engine through the clutch. The input shaft of the gearbox therefore turns at the same rpm as the engine. A 5 speed gearbox applies one of five different gear ratios to the input shaft to produce a different rpm value at the output shaft.

A Very Simple CR-V Gearbox

Let’s look at each of the parts to understand how they fit together

The shaft comes from the engine through the clutch. The shaft and gear are connected as a single unit. (The clutch is a device that lets you connect and disconnect the engine and the gearbox. When you push in the clutch pedal, the engine and the gearbox are disconnected so the engine can run even if the car is standing still. When you release the clutch pedal, the engine and the shaft are directly connected to one another. The shaft and gear turn at the same rpm as the engine.)
The shaft and gears are called the lay shaft. These are also connected as a single piece, so all of the gears on the lay shaft and the lay shaft itself spin as one unit. Both shafts are directly connected through their meshed gears so that one of the shafts is spinning. In this way, the lay shaft receives its power directly from the engine whenever the clutch is engaged.
The shaft is a splinted shaft that connects directly to the drive shaft through the differential to the drive wheels of the car. If the wheels are spinning, the shaft is spinning.
The gears ride on bearings, so they spin on the shaft. If the engine is off but the car is coasting, the shaft can turn inside the gears while gears and the lay shaft are motionless.
The purpose of the collar is to connect one of the gears to the drive shaft. The collar is connected, through the spines, directly to the shaft and spins with the shaft. However, the collar can slide left or right along the shaft to engage either of the gears. Teeth on the collar, called dog teeth, fit into holes on the sides of the gears to engage them.

Checking your gearbox

Watch for leaks or stains under the car: – If there is a persistent oil leak that you are sure is coming from your car, you should have your shop check to see if it is coming from your gearbox or possibly from your power steering system (most power steering systems also use gearbox fluid and leaks can appear on the ground in roughly the same areas as gearbox leaks.) If all you see is a few drops on the ground, you may be able to postpone repairs as long as you check your fluid level often (but check with your technician to be sure.) If gearbox fluid levels go down below minimum levels serious gearbox damage can occur (the same advice goes for power steering leaks as well.)

Check fluid for colour and odour: – Most manufacturers require that you check gearbox fluid levels when the vehicle is running and on level ground. Pull the gearbox dipstick out and check the fluid for colour and odour. Volante gearbox fluid is transparent oil that looks something like cherry cough syrup. If the fluid is cloudy or muddy, or it has a burned odour, you should have it checked by your technician who will most likely advise you to drain your gearbox and refill or gearbox tune-up.

Be sensitive to new noises, vibrations and shift behaviour: – A modern gearbox should shift smoothly and quietly under light acceleration. Heavier acceleration should produce firmer shifts at higher speeds. If shift points are erratic or you hear noises when shifting, you should have it checked out immediately. Whining noises coming from the floorboard are also a cause for concern. If caught early, many problems can be resolved without costly gearbox overhauls. Even if you feel that you can’t afford repairs at this time, you should at least have it checked. The technician may be able to give you some hints on what to do and not do to prolong the gearbox life until you can afford the repair.

Why use us for CR-V Gearbox

We are the gearbox specialists, it’s all we do, and we do it well and we are the best at offering any make or model of gearboxes.

All our automatic gearbox and manual gearbox are available new, second-hand and remanufactured or reconditioned to the highest standards. All our gearbox components meet or exceed all original manufactures specifications, and most of the time the Honda CR-V Gearbox components are sourced from our specialist breakers. You can buy with confidence from us, knowing that you have the best quality Honda CR-V Gearbox with the best warranty protection. We have an extensive network of industry contacts to ensure you find what you are looking for. We have many years of engines and gearbox experience offering gearboxes ready to fit any make or model of vehicle; new, used, or second-hand gearboxes are ready to fit any make or model of vehicle and all have a 100% warranty. You can search your part and receive free quotations by email and have free postage.

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Carl Wilson

You won't believe it, I'm native Scotsman. Enthusiast. Car lovers. Almost finished rebuilding my Reliant Saber 🔥

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